People with ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) are not alone although many of you feel that you are – this is just one of the reasons that ADHD support groups are recommended as an outlet for anyone who suffers from the condition. Remember, there are a lot of people out there who suffer from ADHD and many of them (especially adults) are undiagnosed and don’t even know it.

For those of you who have been diagnosed and realize that you have the disorder, there is help in the form of specific support groups, either one-on-one groups within your communities or online (as with forums). There is quite a bit of similarity in how people with ADHD are affected, even if your particular style or experience with ADHD is different.

You can feel really lonely if you believe that you are the only person with this problem when you are in an environment where everyone else is able to cope with day-to-day life relatively easily, and you just can’t quite make it all work. It can make you depressed or make you feel like something’s wrong with you. The reality is, if you have ADHD, there is something wrong with you, but that’s ok. It can be treated. It can be counter-acted against. You can learn about your personal strengths and the strengths that ADHD actually gives you (like boundless energy, enthusiasm, creativity, and spontaneity) and to harness those in a productive way.

Understanding that you are not the only one in the world that has ADHD is a very powerful feeling – and offers a great deal of relief. Joining a community of other people who live with a similar problem can be extremely therapeutic. In such a community, you can also make new friends and connections with people who really understand you because they are a lot like you.

People join Attention Deficit Hyperactivity support groups because they feel scattered, misunderstood, different, or even better than others in some ways. They join to learn more about ADHD, and they want to meet others who feel and think like they do or like the people in their lives that have ADHD.

ADHD support groups can be large or small – the important thing is that they are there to help. Members could be people from all different backgrounds including nurses, coaches, construction workers, sales associates, self-employed, teachers, students, and all other walks of life.

Some of these support groups have guest speakers every so often. Speakers could be professionals in the community, experts in the field, authors, or just others who suffer from ADHD and have an inspirational story to share. Some support groups have book reviews and travel to relevant events, conventions, and seminars.

Most ADHD support groups are free or ask for a donation or a very inexpensive membership fee. ADHD support groups should be made up of friendly, helpful understanding people who are there to listen, share, and learn as they all strive to make life easier and more enjoyable.

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